Who can benefit ?

  • Benefit
  • Autism
  • Cerebral Palsy
  • Down Syndrome
  • Oncology/Cancer Care
  • Neuro-rehabilitation / Brain Injury
  • Aged Care/ Geriatric Care
  • Underprivileged children
The TMTT clinic offers its services to a varied clinical population. These are some of the areas we work in:
Autism
Cerebral Palsy
Down syndrome
Oncology /Cancer care
Neurorehabilitation/ Brain injury
Age care
Underprivileged children
How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

Children and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) respond well to music. They respond positively to music as compared to other things, which makes music a potential therapeutic tool. Music Therapy for children with autism helps to increase their social interaction and improve social skills. It can also help a child with autism improve their communication skills and reduce their anxiety.

What can parents expect?

Parents will be able to see that when nothing helps, music will be one of those that will attract the child. Through repeated and frequent sessions, they will see a change in the cognitive ability and social behaviour of the child. Parents can expect improvement in the child’s musical skills as well.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

Some of the challenges include slow processing, being highly sensitive to loud sounds, sensory integration problems, and difficulty in expressing thoughts and needs. Taking into account these challenges, the two major goals of a client with autism in a music therapy session are improving communication/ language and improving socio-behavioural skills.

Is there any research evidence?

Yes! Many studies provide evidence that music therapy is beneficial for autistic clients. A 2009 study by Kim, Wigram, & Gold found that children with autism showed more emotional expression and social engagement during music therapy sessions than in play sessions without music.

Another 2004 study from the Journal of Music Therapy found that music used with children and teens with ASD can improve social behaviours, increase focus and attention, increase communication attempts (vocalizations, verbalizations, gestures, and vocabulary), reduce anxiety, and improve body awareness and coordination.

How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

For clients with cerebral palsy, enhanced motor coordination can be achieved through specialized music therapy techniques. Speech and language skills can greatly improve with the help of music therapy. Relaxation of tensed muscles can be facilitated by incorporating music therapy and relaxation techniques. Range of motion exercises paired with music can increase endurance and muscle strength.

What can parents expect?

Parents will see that music works as a motivating medium for those with cerebral palsy. They will see that it not only soothes them but also relaxes them when they are stressed. As time progresses, parents will notice that their child is able to concentrate and focus better as well as respond to external stimuli quickly and appropriately.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

Beyond basic skills is the need for inclusion, acceptance, respect, accessibility and equal opportunity. The goal of the therapy is not to develop a music talent. Rather, it is to develop other skills which they can implement in daily life. These include relaxation, helping the child to concentrate, initiate conversation with other children and adults as well as refining gross and fine motor skills.

Is there any research evidence?

Research has shown that music therapy helps with alertness because the beat of the music helps a child build connections within the brain that help them concentrate and focus. A research conducted in 2003 by Perry, M. confirmed that children with cerebral palsy were able to sustain participation in turn taking, and maintain attention and engagement in their interaction with others.
A 2001 study provided support for the efficacy of music therapy in bringing about significant changes in specific behaviours of persons with Cerebral Palsy in individual as well as group sessions.

How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

Music therapy helps to develop speech and language skills for those with Down syndrome. Pronunciation and oral motor skills can also be developed by using songs in therapy. Music, when paired with visuals can provide a multi-sensory learning experience for the child. Music therapy can also help in improving gross motor skills like sitting, standing and walking. It also helps the child to become more social in the society by involving them in group activities, participating with other children and having a conversation with them – musically or verbally.

What can parents expect?

Due to their diagnosis, children with Down syndrome are quite stubborn. Because of the love and affection they receive in their home environment, they find it difficult to adjust in any social setting. Parents will find that with music therapy, especially in groups, the child will learn to negotiate the space, by sharing instruments with other children and the therapist. They can expect their child to be more expressive and spontaneous with music therapy sessions.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

People with Down syndrome have some level of learning disability. There is also a need for speech development and expressive communication. Children with Down syndrome grow slowly and they are usually smaller than other children of their age. They have poor muscle tone and excessive flexibility. There is a need to develop social skills, self-help skills, interaction and independence.

Is there any research evidence?

Research suggests that use of non-verbal modalities such as music, gesture and sign help children with Down syndrome to communicate effectively without getting frustrated. Those diagnosed with Down syndrome show great potential and are very responsive when music therapy is incorporated in group sessions. (Wigram, 2002) A study by Cohen states that children with Down syndrome enjoy music and love to move, dance, and perform when they hear music

How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

Music therapy provides emotional, physical, psychological and spiritual benefit to the patient by using all the elements of music like melody, tone, lyrics, etc. Music for cancer patients helps to alleviate pain and gives relaxation for the body and mind. It also helps to improve their mood and reduce stress and anxiety. Music therapy can help children to cooperate with medication and also communicate more.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

Cancer patients need comfort and care. They need to find a way to cope with the symptoms and side effects of cancer. Terminally ill patients find it difficult to accept that their life is slowly ending and become depressed and withdrawn. Music therapy can help them to have a positive outlook towards life and also help them accept the situation they are in. It can give temporary relief from medication and can help the patients divert their minds from endless routine of medication, chemotherapy, hospital visits, etc.

Is there any research evidence?

Researchers from Dextrel University conducted a study where relaxing music of all genres was played in the hospital and found that there was significant improvement in anxiety and mood. They also found that music helped to improve the patient’s quality of life. A Cochrane study stated that music therapy lowered pain rate level, heart rate, breathing rate and blood pressure of cancer patients.

  • Case Studies - Read the case studies here:
How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

Following any type of brain injury, the patient suffers from emotional and physiological issues. Music therapy helps to improve the cognitive skills of patients like visual, memory, and language processing. It also helps them to cope and adapt to their current situation. Music can help to distract the patient from any stimuli causing negative experiences like pain, anxiety, depression, worry, etc. Through improvisation, the patient has the opportunity to express their chaos, feelings and unbearable experiences in the music.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

In most cases neurological damage, there is some impairment and disturbance to the cognitive processing. People with severe neurological damage may never completely recover from their cognitive impairments. In those with neurological damage, it is very difficult for them to be attentive as those very parts of the brain have been damaged due to the brain injury. Patients with attention difficulties lack mental energy and get tired easily. A simple task requires a lot of energy to be exerted thus resulting in fatigue. Different techniques of music therapy can help the patient move away from the routine of life, exercise and hospitalization and gives him an opportunity to experience something purposeful and meaningful.

Is there any research evidence?

Research has demonstrated that by using music and language in combination, more preserved neural pathways are accessed than when using language alone. (O’Callaghan, 1999) Improvisation used by trained music therapists help to form a deeper therapeutic relationship with the client and free up any inhibitions or limitations that may block their recovery. (Tomaino, 2013) Music therapy offers comfort and safety and often provides a positive experience and hope for the patient.  Many studies have found that music therapy can facilitate positive mood change.

How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

Music therapy is very effective in maintaining the language skills of elderly clients. Even though a person has dementia or Alzheimer’s, playing their favourite song or a song from their childhood will make them sing along with the therapist. Exercises with strong rhythms and tunes can help a stroke patient regain his speech and talk again. Dancing and movement with music can help to improve the strength, range of motion and coordination. Clients also feel more active and energetic when they are asked to play an instrument together in a group.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

Older adults often have problems with memory and remembering names and events of their past life, etc. Their age and physical problems may not support them in taking care of themselves. The elderly might also not be able to speak fluently, may forget words and sometimes lose their train of thought. Those diagnosed with physical disorders like Parkinson’s disease may suffer from weakness of bones, muscle, stiffness and swelling. Many older adults are in their old age are left to take care of themselves as family members do not give them their time and care. They lose their sense of identity in the society and crave for human contact and belonging.

Is there any research evidence?

A research conducted in 2010 found that music therapy helped in reducing the agitation levels of those diagnosed with dementia along with improving mood and social skills in nursing homes. A study conducted in 2011 found that music therapy improved the overall well-being of the patient by helping them to relax and calm down. In another interesting study in 2000, music events were held for dementia patients along with the care-givers. With the help of music, the bond between the patient and care-giver increased and care-givers found it music easier to take care of them.
How does music therapy help and contribute in this area?

The attractive nature of music always ensures the participation of children in activities. Group music therapy sessions help the child to learn how to negotiate their time and turns with others thus improving their social and language skills. Music therapy helps the child to become more creative and brighter. Music can also help children who come from disturbed families and have a traumatic past. The child finds an outlet to express himself and also discover the musical side of him.

What are the therapeutic needs, challenges and goals of these clients?

Children from marginalized backgrounds do not have access to music and entertainment as compared to other children. Even education is a distant dream for them. Some children are without parents, some live in terrible home environments and some are victims of abuse or violence. They are neglected and abandoned for no fault of theirs. Such children need care and support. They need to feel loved by others and given equal opportunities as any other child. Some children suffering from any disease or disorder also need medical assistance.

Is there any research evidence?

A pilot music therapy study conducted in 2013 for children exposed to abuse and poverty in Korea found significant improvement in internalizing (withdrawal, anxiety, depression) behaviours and externalizing (aggression, delinquency) behaviours. A project in 2004 took place in Africa where music therapy was given to residents and communities. Music helped the residents cope with their problems and rejoice in spite of their difficulties. They felt happier and united as played and sang together.

If you have any questions regarding Music Therapy, please do not hesitate to get in touch.